Building a Tandoor 

Welcome back folks.  Today I’m back with another topic in the world of hobbies and leisure, and something I love to do when I’ve got a few hours spare is to cook Indian food at home.  It’s been on my mind for a long time now that I should have a go at building my very own tandoor, just outside so I can dip into it whenever needed.  More importantly, it’ll open the diversity of the dishes I’ll be able to cook when I have friends or family over.  I can smell it now: the tandoori chicken, the sheesh kebabs, the shami kebabs, the chicken tikka, the real home cooked naan breads smothered with garlic.  This one will be a real game changer. 

Building a Tandoor

So, I had a little look into and it’s nowhere near as nigh on impossible as I suspected it would be.  It’s not too much more than a case of nipping down to the local garden centre and picking up three flowerpots.  I’m not joking.  When I say flowerpots however I do in fact mean terra-cotta clay pots.  The idea is that you try and get the biggest one you can find.  This acts as a benchmark to the others.  The second pot needs to be smaller than the first and the third needs to be smaller than the second. 

All you need to do is cut the bottom off the smallest pot so that you’ve got a kind of conical sleeve. The bit you have cut off will later form the overall tandoor lid.  So, it’s as simple as 1, 2, 3.  Firstly sit the second pot inside the first and fill the surrounding void with small stones up to the level of the second pot.  The smallest pot now sits upside-down on top of the second pot forming the interior of the tandoor and is held firmly in place when you continue to fill the void with stones up to the lip of the smallest pot.  Simply add charcoal to the bottom of the tandoor interior, light it up and the whole ‘oven should reach up to 430/440 degrees C in no time.  Then it’s time to get the kebabs out, crack a cold one and get excited! 

Thanks for dropping by folks, until next time..